Get a Handle on Critical Audit Matters

July 30, 2018

Published: The Caq

Cindy Fornelli is the Executive Director of the Center for Audit Quality

Last year, following approval by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) adopted a new auditing standard that significantly changes the auditor’s report—with equally significant implications for investors, audit committees and others. The new standard is now moving through an implementation period.

The identification and communication of critical audit matters (CAMs) is the most significant change required by the new standard. If you feel like you don’t fully have a handle on CAMs yet, you’re not alone. Here are some FAQs to help.

What is a CAM?

The CAMs requirement adopted by the PCAOB is intended to make the auditor’s report more informative and relevant to investors and other users of financial statements. According to the new standard, a CAM is “any matter arising from the audit of the financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee” and that:

  • relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements, and;
  • involved especially challenging, subjective, or complex auditor judgment.

How will auditors determine whether a matter is a CAM?

The determination of whether a matter is a CAM is principles based, and the new standard does not specify that any matter would always be a CAM. The new standard specifies that an auditor, in determining whether a matter involved especially challenging, subjective, or complex auditor judgment, should take into account, alone or in combination, certain nonexclusive factors (as specified in the new standard), such as the auditor’s assessment of the risks of material misstatement, including significant risks.

What impact will CAMs have on the communication between the auditor and audit committee?

The source of CAMs are those matters communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee. PCAOB auditing standards already require a wide range of topics to be discussed and communicated with the audit committee, which in most cases means most, and that it is likely that all of the matters that will be CAMs are already being discussed with the audit committee. However, not every topic that is discussed with the audit committee will rise to the level of a CAM. The PCAOB Board believes there should not be a chilling effect or reduced communications to the audit committee because the requirements for such communications are not changing.

Could a significant deficiency in internal control be a CAM?

The determination that there is a significant deficiency in internal control over financial reporting cannot be a CAM because such determination in and of itself is not related to an account or disclosure. However, a significant deficiency could be among the principal considerations that led the auditor to determine a matter is a CAM. For example, if a significant deficiency was among the principal considerations in determining that revenue recognition was a CAM, then the auditor could describe the relevant control-related issues over revenue recognition in the broader context of the CAM without using the term “significant deficiency.”

Will CAMs only relate to the current audit period?

The PCAOB requires the communication of CAMs identified in the current audit period. While most companies’ financial statements are presented on a comparative basis, requiring auditors to communicate CAMs for the current period, rather than for all periods presented, will provide relevant information about the most recent audit and is intended to reflect a cost-sensitive approach to auditor reporting. In addition, investors and other financial statement users will be able to look at prior years’ filings to analyze CAMs over time; however, the standard permits the auditor to choose to include CAMs for prior periods.

Will the auditor be the original source of information about the company in the auditor’s CAM communication?

The new standard includes a note explaining that the auditor is not expected to provide information about the company that has not been made publicly available by the company, unless such information is necessary to describe the principal considerations that led the auditor to determine that a matter is a CAM or how the matter was addressed in the audit. The SEC has stated that they believe that situations where auditors would be required to provide information about the company that management has not already made public would be exceptions, arising only in limited circumstances, and not a pervasive occurrence.

What impact are CAMs expected to have on financial reporting?

Increased attention on CAMs could result in an incremental focus on aspects of management’s related disclosures. This could result in discussion between and among management, the audit committee, and the auditor on how CAMs are described, and that may have an impact on management’s consideration of the information to disclose in the financial statements related to that particular matter. Early dialogue among auditors, management, and the audit committee will be important.

These questions and much more are covered in a new publication from the Center for Audit Quality (CAQ), Critical Audit Matters: Key Concepts and FAQs for Audit Committees, Investors, and Other Users of Financial Statements. I invite you to read that report and to find more resources on auditor reporting at the CAQ website.

https://listingcenter.nasdaq.com/ClearinghouseArticle/Get-a-Handle-on-Critical-Audit-Matters-1627

 

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